Deedle&Thread

Sewing, Beading, Inspiration and More.

Rust and Navy Knit Tunic

10

Front Long View 618WIMG_4356[1]In the spirit of early fall and pumpkin season, I whipped up this Butterick 5925, a Katherine Tilton tunic.  Have I mentioned how I love it when the end of October rolls around and brings a little chill to the air?   This is the consistent time of year in Tucson when sweaters and coats are realistic to wear.  I happen to love it (I probably should be living in a cooler climate).   I also love this top because it is easy to make, uses up some small knit remnants for the accents and is very comfortable.

FrontMid ShotIMG_4348[1]
The long necklace is thrifted from a local bookstore – a little unexpected find from an unusual place.  It is jasper and hand knotted.  I think I paid $12.
As you can see from the line drawing, there are many ways to combine fabrics.  I chose View B but left off the pocket.  I didn’t want to add any bulk at the hip and have the stripe fabric be more visible.  The contrast I chose was simpler than Katherine had designed for View B, where you can incorporate 3 fabrics.  I shortened the sleeves to a 3/4 length which is a year round length for me AND allows for a little visible arm candy.

Back view of pattern

This style shirt and the use of different knit fabrics allow for so many options. I had no fitting issues, except for the neck band which is always tricky so that it lays flat. You know, a neck band that is not too tight, not too loose = SAGGY. Yuck.  In the words of Michael Kors, “Becky Home-Ecky”.    No preventable saggy necks.  So what to do?   I haven’t figured out the perfect formula for the knit neck bands.  Online classes and various teachers have suggested three-quarters of the neck circumference should be the neck band length, but that doesn’t always work due to the amount of stretch the fabric may have.  If it is a low stretch, like Ponte knit or matte jersey, the neck strip will need to be longer in order to stretch around the neckline and still lay flat.  Super stretchy fabric will be shorter in length for the neckband.  I find pinning it and distributing it as evenly as possible around the neckline works best.   Basically, I have to experiment every time.  I like to jot down the length on my instruction sheet to a have reference info for the future.

Up Close Agate NecklaceIMG_4380[1]

Here is another jewelry option.  Earrings are from Payless Shoe Source!! Can you believe it? Never underestimate the gems that can be found in unlikely places.  The necklace is self made with agate tubes and spacer beads.

Necklace VerticalIMG_4407[1]Below, the side view shows how a triangle piece adds great interest (often called a gore).

Here is the Google definition pertaining to fabric:
ɡôr/noun
noun: gore; plural noun: gores
1. a triangular or tapering piece of material used in making a garment, sail, or umbrella.
verb
verb: gore; 3rd person present: gores; past tense: gored; past participle: gored; gerund or present participle: goring
1. make with a gore-shaped piece of material.
“a gored skirt”

Side ViewIMG_4364[1]

IMG_4361[1]

CoverProHemIMG_4405[1]

This is the cover stitch hem I did using 4 different threads with my Janome CoverPro machine. As you can see, the three threads show on top.  The fourth thread color is on the underneath side.

I even had enough fabric left over to make a tank and infinity scarf.  I have a post about infinity scarves here.

Cowl InfinityIMG_4402[1]
Long Infinity ScarfIMG_4403[1]

The tank is from the Ann’s Cardigan post. I lengthened it a bit from the waist down so that it can be worn as a vest over a button down shirt or under a cardigan or jacket. The scarf can be worn with the rust boots, and a completely different outfit.
Here is the 8 inch slit on the side of the tank.

Side SlitIMG_4404[1]

So there you have it. Another completed sewing project and some jewelry to match.   I hope you will grab this pattern while it is still in the Butterick book and make one up.

On to the next project!
-Dana

10 Comments

  1. Rachel

    Woo-hoo! Another post! Keep ’em coming… I’m enjoying all of the projects. This tunic is great! And kudos for stash-busting with the tank and infinity scarf 🙂

    Reply
    • Dana

      Rachel-Thanks for commenting. Ya, I’m learning from you! Now that the weather is cooler, I’m a lot more motivated. I’ll keep ’em coming!

      Reply
  2. Sunie Stanton

    Dana — I love the top! I wish I knew more about fabric and sewing but I’m lucky if I an thread a needle. I have toys of Lily’s (my Westie) that are waiting in the “hospital” for me to get more stuffing to repair them. That’s as much as I can do. I love looking at what you’ve created, though. It’s fun just to see what you’ve come up with!

    Love ya! Sunie

    Reply
    • Dana

      Hey Sunie-
      Being handy with thread and a needle is very useful and is often the only way to do repairs. I hope your little furry friend gets out of the ‘hospital’ soon. Thanks for commenting.

      Reply
  3. Amy

    HI Dana, I came across your blog when I was researching the Dressing Your Truth program. I have read the book and am a Type 2. I really enjoyed the post you did on the program with the items you purchased, etc. I was wondering if you still follow the program and how has it been working for you?

    You sew beautifully and have a great fashion sense.

    I do not have a blog but am just a stay at home mom who lives in Pittsburgh and is interested in the program. 🙂

    Reply
    • Dana

      Hi stargellfan- Thank you for commenting. I have to say that when I first came across the DYT info, there was something so compelling about the way Carol clarified all of the energy types that I absorbed it all. My first instinct was to thrift shop for the Type 2 items, which I did with great success. I have since relaxed a bit, incorporating other colors and styles into my wardrobe. I suppose because I sew, the fabrics and sewing patterns always tug at me to create and explore new items and styles and I don’t necessarily want to be confined to the T2 parameters. It could also be said that the T2 parameters are freeing–in that they give a great structure to make dressing, coordinating and accessorizing easier. I truly believe that the T2 colors look best on me, complimenting my coloring and temperament. That being said, I still wear black occasionally and do not ‘feel’ any differently when I do. My few thoughts to you would be to have fun with discovering the T2 colors and design lines out there expressed in clothing, accessories, hair styles, etc. Try it out for a while and see how it feels and how it works in your life. Carol will put the program on sale occasionally which I purchased, and found the online resources to be helpful, educational and just plain fun! I hope you will write back and share your thoughts. Regards, Dana

      Reply
  4. MARTHA VANCE

    i LOVE THIS TUNIC. I HAVE MORE THAN SEVERAL THAT ARE ALMOST EXACTLY LIKE THIS ONE AND I WEAR THEM ALL THE TIME, BECAUSE THEY ARE SO VERSATILE AND COMFORTABLE. HOWEVER, I BOUGHT MINE AND THE PRICE FOR THEM RAN ANYWHERE FROM 40 TO 60 DOLLARS. I AM SURE BY DOING THE SEWING, THAT YOU SAVED A CONSIDERABLE AMOUNT. THIS IS MY FIRST TIME TO SEE OR VISIT YOUR SITE AND AS I AM BROWSING, I FIND IT QUITE INTERESTING. LOOKING FORWARD TO JOURNEYING THROUGH THIS SITE MORE OFTEN.

    Reply
    • Dana

      Hi lolhoneybunny-I’m glad you came across my blog and enjoyed it. Recently, I haven’t been sewing (or blogging) as much as I’d like, due to a new job, but tunics like this are just the best thing to sew up in a jiff when I want immediate gratification. I encourage you to learn to sew if you can because the skill is so great to have.
      Please keep checking back and thank you for commenting.

      Reply
      • MARTHA VANCE

        I have been sewing since I was a teenager. I made my wedding dress and entered county fairs and won several ribbons for my sewing ability. I have in the past years got away from it due to health reasons and then my husband bought me a embroidery machine and I have been trying to master it and of course it sews too. I am a crafter and so my attention goes from one project to another. Yours were just so stately and beautiful. I love the finished look yours had, where most people who sew don’t pay attention to that detail. thanks.

        Reply
        • Dana

          Hi Martha-It sounds like you enjoy sewing and the versatility it offers you to change from garments, to embroidery to crafts. Like you, I love the variety I have available to move from one creative project to another. There are many unfinished projects in my sewing room and I am okay with that. The creative process is what I enjoy the most and I go back and forth from different projects based on my excitement level. I’m glad we share this!

          Reply

So, what do you think ?